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Fear.  It's that chill that creeps up your spine.  That awful, churning hot knot, deep in the pit of your stomach.  The tremble that makes your hands feel powerless.  The freeze-up, that tempts you to inaction.  But you can't give in to it.  You still need to DO SOMETHING.
 
I'm not a very public person by nature.  But right now life -- my activist life, and life on the planet in general -- demands that I do some very public things.  It's terrifying.
 
My husband tells me fear and excitement have some of the same roots.  Maybe.  Sometimes it is excitement, disguised.  But sometimes, like a week ago Wednesday, like today, it is just plain wanting-to-crawl-in-a-hole rather than do what needs to be done.

In the May Tele-salon, we had Transition folks calling in from Gilroy, CA; Columbus, OH; San Diego, CA; Houston, TX; New York City, NY; Chicago, IL; and Santa Cruz, CA.

Open dialogue space was used to facilitate a conversation on celebrations, challenges, and brainstorming. Below is a summary of highlights from the call.

Celebrations:

This post is part of a series called “Taking Practical Action Toward Resilience” highlighting inspiring actions that people and communities across the country are taking as part of this year's Transition Challenge.

Written by Ruah Swennerfelt, Core Group Member, Transition Charlotte, VT

A delightful and thoroughly enjoyable read:  in my many years of reading environmental books there aren't many I could say that about.  I found The Seed Undergound on a table at the home of a member of Transition Mar Vista/Venice, at an open house (open garden) as part of last month's 100+ home Mar Vista Green Garden Showcase.  
 
The book's quirky handwritten double-entendre title called to me -- plus it was about SEEDS.  The cover photo looks a bit like the shelves in my house.  I opened the book to a random page, and after the first clever turn of phrase I was hooked.  I kept reading humourous excerpts aloud to anyone at the event who would listen.
 
The Seed Underground is a wonderful and heart-warming story, a treasure hunt in the best, most joyous meanings of the phrase.  The book threads together a series of personal vignettes as author Janisse Ray seeks and collects seeds for many varieties of heritage and heirloom food plants.

This post is part of a series called “Taking Practical Action Toward Resilience” highlighting inspiring actions that people and communities across the country are taking as part of this year's Transition Challenge.

By Monika Antonelli, member of Transition Mulling group, Mankato, MN

This post is part of a series called “Taking Practical Action Toward Resilience” highlighting inspiring actions that people and communities across the country are taking as part of this year's Transition Challenge.

 

By Ronald Lapitan, High School Student & member of Transition Mulling group, Falls Church, VA

This post is part of a series called “Taking Practical Action Toward Resilience” highlighting inspiring actions that people and communities across the country are taking as part of this year's Transition Challenge

By Kaat Vander Straeten, Transition Wayland, MA

The annual Transition Challenge is in motion! This month, thousands of people across the country are taking action to build community resilience, enhance local food systems, and reduce energy and water consumption. Over 3,000 actions have already been registered, bringing us one step closer to our goal of 5,000 actions.

By Andrew Watkins, Belfast Area Transition Initiative (BATI), Maine

We're excited to feature Andrew's post on his cross-country bike trip as the first in a series called “Taking Practical Action Toward Resilience” highlighting inspiring actions that people and communities across the country are taking as part of this year's Transition Challenge.

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