Diversity & Social Justice: Transition for whom and to what end, "Transitioning for All?" (MATH TeleSeminar Series)

Date: 
Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm

This event is part of the 2015 Mid-Atlantic Transition Hub (MATH) Teleseminar Series "The Maturation of a Social Movement: A Regional Response to a Critique of the Transition Movement," in response to the Simplicity Institute paper "The Transition Movement: Questions of Diversity, Power, and Affluence."

Resource depletion and climate change effects various demographic groups in vastly different ways. Recovery ​within​ historically disenfranchised communities from hurricanes and Superstorms Katrina, Irene, Lee and Sandy looked radically different than that of communities which typify the overall Transition Town demographic. ​Transitioners tend to be predominantly white, educated, post materialist, middleclass, small community people. 

How does ​that Transitioner demographic reality impact the reach and relevance of our work​ in the Mid-Atlantic region​ which ​incorporates ​one of ​the most highly diverse and population-dense corridor​s​ on the planet​?

This question prompted Thursday’s (1/29 @7:00pmEST) eco-justice – social-justice teleseminar conversation, during which the Mid-Atlantic Transition Hub (MATH) invites guest speakers to explore:  

·         ​​how we can skillfully work with various levels of vulnerability and competing interests within communities​,

·         how we ​can ​fold ​local ​community power dynamics conditioned by ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic stratification that shape relationships into our work​,

·         the intersection of the Transition environmental movement with social justice movements. 

Pamela Boyce Simms, Convener of ​The Mid-Atlantic Transition Hub (MATH) welcomes: Yasmin Stewart​,​ a community activist with the Call to Action Long term Recovery Group in Superstorm Sandy-devastated Far Rockaway, NY. Yasmin bears personal witness to the pre-storm isolation and demographic stratification of Rockaway, "the forgotten New York," profound personal loss in the storm, and the life-shattering bureaucratic abuse of the Far Rockway community in its aftermath​;​ Dr. G. Modele Clarke​,​ a social justice advocate​ and​ senior pastor of the New Progressive Baptist Church, a hub of "End the New Jim Crow," and "Undoing Racism" social activism work in Kingston, NY​; and ​Joanie​ Freeman, an initiator with Transition Charlottesville Abelmarle,  who​ has tried multiple approaches to bridging the racial divide prevalent in Charlottesville, fostering diversity in Transition and in the Ecovillage where Transition is headquartered in Charlottesville.

To join the conversation, please register online and you will receive call details via email.

Speaker Bios:

Rev. Dr. G. Modele Clarke is a social justice advocate who is committed to helping improve people's lives. Born in Trinidad, West Indies, Reverend Clarke is senior pastor of the New Progressive Baptist Church, a hub of "End the New Jim Crow," and "Undoing Racism" social activism work in Kingston, NY.  Dr. Clarke has lectured and ministered in Uganda, Trinidad, Grand Cayman Island and Puerto Rico.

A retired faculty member with the School of Communication and the Arts, Marist College, Poughkeepsie, New York, Clarke taught several journalism-related classes. He graduated from the State University of New York (SUNY) at New Paltz and from Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. He was a reporter, editor, columnist, freelance magazine writer, and public relations practitioner. He received masters of divinity (MDiv) and doctor of ministry (DMin) from Trinity Theological Seminary. He was also inducted into the National Omicron-Psi Honor Society for his distinguished theological scholarship and community service. Clarke also studied at New York Theological Seminary, where he was the recipient of the Benjamin Mays Fellowship. He is the author of "Up in Mahaica: Stories from the Market People," a collection of short stories about unusual characters in an oil refinery town in Trinidad. Clarke lives in Port Ewen, New York, with his wife, Evelyn.

Joanie Freeman presently lives in Charlottesville, Virginia after volunteering around the world for six years; engaging primarily with environmental issues. Joanie spent her early years growing up in a city housing project in the Bronx, New York City.  She then went onto Miami, Florida for high school and finished her education at the University of Florida earning a degree in special education. Raised in a family that stayed conscious of the people and world around, Joanie continued to seek answers to the injustice she saw around her in Charlottesville as a Transition initiator. Joanie has tried multiple approaches to bridging the racial divide prevalent in Charlottesville, fostering diversity in Transition and in the Ecovillage where Transition is headquartered in Charlottesville. Joanie is the mother of two sons and two granddaughters. She is deeply committed to the Transition experiment and anything that will make life livable and respectable for future generations.

Pamela Boyce Simms, a change agent and public speaker for over 25 years, offers Transition Initiatives an experiential understanding of how groups can work when at their best.  A veteran of organizational development and team building, Pamela helps initiatives work toward a progressive mastery of group dynamics that is essential to the long term traction, momentum and success of Transition towns. She adapts her expertise with a suite of facilitation tools, consensus building, systems development, and change management technologies to the needs of specific groups and organizations. One of seven original initiators of Woodstock Transition in Ulster County, New York, Pamela now convenes the Mid--Atlantic Transition Hub (MATH), a six-state consortium of Transitioners that facilitates the collaboration of Transition initiatives throughout the region.

Yasmin Stewart is a community activist with the Call to Action Long term Recovery Group in Superstorm Sandy-devastated Far Rockaway, NY. Yasmin bears personal witness to the pre-storm isolation and demographic stratification of Rockaway, "the forgotten New York," profound personal loss in the storm, and the life-shattering bureaucratic abuse of the Far Rockway community in its aftermath. Yasmin is an educator with over 30 years of experience teaching and training teachers in curriculum implementation. Yasmin develops, coordinates and manages professional development seminars and conferences. She is passionate about working with organizations that promote scholarship and professional development with an emphasis on learning that's creative and experiential.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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